Mission to Seafarers expands with new center in Myanmar

first_imgMission to Seafarers expands with new center in Myanmar Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Mission to Seafarers new mission centre in Yangon was dedicated last weekend during a service in Holy Trinity Cathedral. Photo: Mission for Seafarers[Anglican Communion News Service] The city of Yangon in Myanmar is home to the Mission to Seafarers’ newest port facility. The Anglican mission agency’s newest mission centre was dedicated on Feb. 28 during a service at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Yangon (formerly known as Rangoon).The new facility is located close to the Department of Marine Administration in Yangon, which will enable Myanmar’s seafarers to access it easily.A second Mission to Seafarers (MtS) drop-in facility is planned for Hutchinson Ports’ Myanmar International Terminals Thilawa (MITT). MtS hope that this facility, serving the deep water port 16 miles south of Yangon, will open later on this year.A former deck cadet who now holds a master mariner’s licence, George Ko Ko Gyi, will head up the MtS Yangon Mission; assisted by Mya Min Tun. They will arrange a ship-visiting programme, administer the main centre and provide day to day support and advice for seafarers and their families.“I am delighted to see the opening of The Mission to Seafarers in Yangon Myanmar which has come after a year of careful planning, research and negotiations with the local church, the port authority and our Mission Committee here in Hong Kong,” the chairman of the Mission to Seafarers Hong Kong, Anthony Nightingale, said.“Funds raised by the Mission to Seafarers in Hong Kong for this purpose amounting to $30,000 [USD, approximately £21,620 GBP] were provided along with strategic support to the project after the MtS Global Review of Ports project identified a strong need for seafarers to have access to support and care in this port.“I wish to thank our Regional Director for East Asia the Revd Canon Stephen Miller who led the delivery team and worked within a highly complex political and legal landscape to bring our vital maritime welfare work for seafarers to Myanmar’s most important port. Yangon accounts for over 90 per cent of all imports and exports to the country and it has expanded capacity from around 1m tons to 3m tons since 1996.“Formerly known as Burma, Myanmar is only just expanding its trade and international relations after many years of closed borders and civil war. This ground-breaking project is inspired by the new energy and dynamism which has grown in the country in recent years and I wish the new team there every success.”The new co-ordinator of MtS in Yangon, George Ko Ko Gyi, said: “Yangon is one of the main seaports in Myanmar and also a key city for supplying labour to the shipping industry worldwide. We will provide vital welfare support and pastoral care to all seafarers and their families, in partnership with the local church and port authorities.”The MtS secretary general, the Revd Andrew Wright, commented: “The Mission is committed to the support of seafarers and their families. In the last year we have underlined that ‘family’ element of our work with projects in the Philippines, in Ukraine and now in Myanmar.“Further developments are expected in other areas during 2016. As secretary general I am absolutely delighted with the rapid progress that has been made and at the clear evidence that these projects are proving a major benefit to seafarers’ families. Such projects enable us to ensure joined-up work – family issues raised with our support teams in ports and on-board ship are able to be followed up locally, as well as many families being able to approach us directly.“The launch of the project in Myanmar is a further significant milestone and I applaud all who have been involved. Many seafarers come from Myanmar and they will be delighted to know that a new kind of support is available to their loved ones at home. The Mission to Seafarers is committed to developing new work in Myanmar, not just with families, but also through the provision of an in-port welfare service to seafarers. I look forward to keeping in close touch as this project goes forward.” Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. read more

Presiding Bishop part of group for conversation amid ‘deep differences’

first_imgPresiding Bishop part of group for conversation amid ‘deep differences’ Rector Bath, NC Comments (5) Yvonne Finne says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Randy Marks says: May 11, 2016 at 8:18 am Just as a bit more information about ECUSA:“There are 110 dioceses in the United States, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Haiti, Honduras, Puerto Rico, Taiwan, Venezuela and the Virgin Islands. The Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe and the Navajoland Area Mission are jurisdictions similar to a diocese.[10][11][12] The Presiding Bishop is one of three Anglican primates who together exercise metropolitan jurisdiction over the Episcopal Church of Cuba, which is an extraprovincial diocese in the Anglican Communion”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Episcopal_Church_(United_States)#Structure Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Primates Meeting 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET May 10, 2016 at 4:22 pm “U.S.-based Episcopal Church”? You would think that the Archbishop of Canterbury’s office would know that we are “The Episcopal Church.” Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Primates Meeting, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img May 10, 2016 at 5:05 pm Perhaps to distinguish us from, say, the “Scottish Episcopal Church,” the member of the worldwide Anglican Communion from Scotland. We Americans tend to think we’re the only ones who claim a particular title. In my experience that’s rarely the case. Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS read more

Episcopalians say Trump’s DACA decision is not the last word

first_imgEpiscopalians say Trump’s DACA decision is not the last word From Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., activists are mobilizing to convince Congress Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Terry Francis says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Donald Trump, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL ronald freeman says: September 6, 2017 at 4:29 pm Like we should deal with all of Trump’s illegal and unconstitutional Executive Orders? If Congress will ever get its act together and actually pass some legislation, perhaps we will get real and meaningful immigration reform. Taking out your anger on children who had no say in coming here, and who know only this country as their home, is contrary to the American spirit and to the welcoming gospel of Jesus. September 5, 2017 at 4:42 pm Demonstrations, protests and leftist rage are not the answer. We must compel the Republicans and the Democrats in Congress to act to preserve the intent and effect of DACA and to finally pass meaningful, just immigration reform. As Republicans and Democrats alike, we need to stop voting for feel good ideologues and start voting for leadership! September 7, 2017 at 1:41 pm Protest is protected in our Constitution, and as citizens it is our civic responsibility (mandate) to protest an unjust government. Study history, not “Fox Fascist Fabrications! TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tom in Long Beach says: September 5, 2017 at 7:05 pm Right on and, further, the Episcopal Church should be responsible and only support a proper legal resolution to this through legislation, as the US Constitution prescribes. This means pressing one’s house and senate representatives to pass a bill; not reinstating DACA, which would be overturned by the courts in time anyway. DACA is an illegal and unconstitutional Executive Order by President Obama, which he knew was illegal and publicly stated so before he decided to do it illegally anyway. This seems to be as good a solution as there is for this situation. We are a nation of laws and not of unlawful actions. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Jawaharlal Prasad says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Immigration, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bill Louis says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK September 6, 2017 at 8:05 pm Terry, Me too. I am saddened by the Episcopal Church as a whole. From the bullying of Texas over their proposed bathroom policy, the removal of historical stained glass in churches including the National Cathedral to the advocation and encouragement for breaking immagration laws the Episcopal Church has become a Progressive Leftist lobbying organization. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books W. Charles Paul says: September 6, 2017 at 3:18 pm Charles Paul, I am equally saddened by the rhetoric of psuedo-Christian left-wing religionists like yourself. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Doug Desper says: By Pat McCaughanPosted Sep 5, 2017 Featured Events September 5, 2017 at 7:00 pm Fools. DACA is at great risk of being repealed by the Federal Courts. If that happens Dreamers are at risk of immediate deportation. Trump bought them a minimum of 6 months, actually most can renew the work for another 2 years. I am in favor of Congress fixing the Dreamer’s plight. All your shrill left wing babel turn me off. You can get read more

Diócesis de Alaska respalda iniciativas sobre el clima mientras se…

first_img Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Por David PaulsenPosted Sep 19, 2017 Miembros de la Coalición para la Iniciativa del Clima de Fairbanks posan para una foto el 9 de enero después de una manifestación ante el edificio federal en Fairbanks en contra de nominados para el gabinete de Trump que niegan el cambio climático. Foto de Fairbanks Climate Action Coalition, vía Facebook.[Episcopal News Service] La Diócesis Episcopal de Alaska está colaborando con una organización comunitaria llamada  Coalición para la Iniciativa del Clima de Fairbanks [Fairbanks Climate Action Coalition] para concienciar a las comunidades acerca de las fuentes de energía renovables y capacitar a los nativos alasqueños y a otros residentes para pronunciarse sobre problemas relacionados con el cambio climático.El programa de la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias de la Iglesia Episcopal o UTO [por su sigla en inglés] le ha otorgado a la diócesis una subvención de $5.000 este año para apoyar la coalición y sus empeños, los cuales aún están cobrando impulso tres años después de que un pequeño grupo de activistas comenzara a colaborar sobre estos temas.“El año pasado, habían acabado de ganar una increíble energía en el desarrollo de esta comunidad ecuménica que se organiza en torno al tema de la energía sostenible y del medioambiente sostenible”, dijo el obispo Mark Lattime en una entrevista telefónica con Episcopal News Service.La oficina de la diócesis en Fairbanks cuenta sólo con un personal de tres miembros, consecuentemente Lattime dijo que la manera que la diócesis encuentra de vivir su pacto bautismal de cuidar la creación de Dios es apoyando la buena obra de ciudadanos y episcopales activos en el ámbito local.Miembros de la Cámara de Obispos de la Iglesia episcopal se enterarán de estas y otras iniciativas semejantes cuando se reúnan en Fairbanks a partir del 21 de septiembre. Como anfitrión, Lattime está enfatizando los temas del cuidado de la creación y la justicia racial para el pueblo indígena. Estos dos temas están estrechamente relacionados, afirmó.“Mi perspectiva de esto consistía en honrar a nuestra gente nativa y sus preocupaciones por el cuidado de la creación. Son ellos la gente que  vive más cercana a la tierra —gente que ha dependido de un estilo de vida de subsistencia durante siglos— esos son los que se ven afectados por el cambio climático de manera más significativa”, dijo él.Lattime habló acerca de las dificultades y alegrías de ministrar en Alaska en una serie de vídeos que pueden verse aquí.Los obispos, que se reunirán del 21 al 27 de septiembre, dedicarán un día a visitar aldeas nativas en el interior [del estado]. Escucharán las historias de los vecinos de las aldeas y luego bendecirán la tierra, el agua y otros recursos naturales.La reunión de la Cámara de Obispos también incluirá una presentación sobre la cultura indígena alasqueña. Una de las presentadoras será Princess Johnson, residente de Fairbanks de ascendencia gwich’in que fue una de los fundadores de la Coalición para la Iniciativa del Clima de Fairbanks. Ella también fue miembro de la delegación de la Iglesia Episcopal que viajó a París en diciembre de 2015 para la Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático, conocida también como COP21.“Debemos reconocer nuestra conexión con nuestra Madre Tierra y nuestro papel en ser realmente protectores, y también que no podemos vivir sin aire , agua y tierra incontaminados y que necesitamos en última instancia abandonar los combustibles fósiles”, dijo Johnson a ENS.Ella dijo que la Coalición para la Iniciativa del Clima de Fairbanks se originó en conversaciones que ella sostuvo con otros alasqueños con los que coincidió en septiembre de 2014 en una manifestación en Fairbanks en solidaridad con la Marcha Popular del Clima en Nueva York. Esas conversaciones llevaron a las iniciativas concretas que ellos podían tomar localmente para combatir el cambio climático, y la coalición nació en noviembre de 2015.Ganó más auge después que se llegara al acuerdo del clima en COP21. Los activistas locales tuvieron un sentido adicional de urgencia este año luego de que el presidente Donald Trump dijera que retiraría a Estados Unidos del acuerdo del clima de París, dijo Johnson.La coalición ha creado varios equipos de trabajo  para dirigir iniciativas tales como energía renovable y colaboración interreligiosa. Las reuniones y sesiones de adiestramiento de la Coalición suelen atraer ahora a varias docenas de vecinos del área de Fairbanks inclinados hacia el ambientalismo. La educación es un gran énfasis y la coalición anhela expandir esa labor con la ayuda de los $5.000 de la subvención de la UTO.“Ha habido una larga historia, creo yo, de la Iglesia Episcopal manteniéndose a la vanguardia y con un read more

Come, labor on: Program, Budget & Finance begins triennial budget…

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books President of the House of Deputies, Rector Shreveport, LA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 23, 2017 Come, labor on: Program, Budget & Finance begins triennial budget work General Convention committee gets a pep talk and a context for doing its work Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Program Budget & Finance Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Executive Council, Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 read more

Joanna Udal honored for service to Anglican Communion

first_img Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN People Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Judith Gregory says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (1) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Joanna Udal honored for service to Anglican Communion Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Archbishop of Canterbury, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Feb 7, 2018 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID February 8, 2018 at 11:04 am Thank you so much for your service Joanne. I am the traveler you shared your home with in Khartoum in 2008. May God Bless You and Keep You Always. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Rector read more

South Sudan archbishop prays for peace with country’s president

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT South Sudan archbishop prays for peace with country’s president Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Africa, Posted Nov 28, 2018 center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY [Anglican Communion News Service] South Sudan Archbishop Justin Badi Arama has paid a visit to South Sudan President Salva Kiir to pray for peace in the country. During the visit, Arama thanked Kiir for his continued support for the country’s churches and for his support for the funeral of the late Bishop Peter Munde, who died last month.Read the full article here. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC read more

Orange County Proposed Budget – $285 Million for Public Works

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! According to County Commissioner Bryan Nelson, “The Orange County Public Works Department does an amazing job with the infrastructure that most of us take for granted.”The Public Works Department of Orange County is responsible for an array of services including, building and maintaining the county’s roads, drainage, and stormwater networks. The work the Department does on a daily basis is crucial due to a growing population and the increased number of vehicles on the roads. More specifically, the department makes sure that roads and pedestrian walkways are efficient, effective, and safe for travel of all Orange County residents. In addition, the department works with the community, industry groups, and agencies to determine infrastructure needs. Public Works plays a major role in the mitigation of flooding due to storms by overseeing the county’s stormwater infrastructure and controlling stormwater runoff. The Public Works Department is made up of seven divisions all with a specific mission. These include the Development Engineering, Fiscal & Operational Support, Highway Construction, Public Works Engineering, Roads & Drainage, Stormwater Management, and Traffic Engineering divisions.County CommissionerBryan NelsonIn the past fiscal year Public Works has been successful in maintaining 2,835 miles of roadways, 1,772 retention ponds, 593 traffic signals, and 25, 616 traffic signs. It has also successfully installed 6.2 miles of new sidewalks, and resurfaced 175 miles of arterial, collector, and subdivision roads.There are nearly $99 million included in the proposed operating budget for Public Works as part of the fiscal year (FY) 2016-2017 budget. This funding will ensure all roads, traffic signals, and drainage systems are successfully maintained for all county residents. The major source of revenue for the Public Works comes from sales tax revenue. Traditionally a majority of revenue for the department came from the fuel tax, but with fuel efficiency technology advancing revenue from this funding source has decreased. Orange County has filled in this funding gap with $82 million from sales tax revenue.Public Works expenditures can be categorized into two categories, operating and non-operating expenditures. Personnel services are a major subcategory of operating expenditures. This includes employee salaries, and benefits including health care, stormwater structures, and facilities. Total personnel expenditure is $99 Million. Non-personnel expenditures include capital improvements. This includes funding for new and expanded roadways, repaving, pedestrian safety, strormwater, drainage, and traffic improvements. Total non-operating expenditures are $187 Million. Part of the budget also includes funding from the INVEST In Our Home for Life initiative.Use this link to see details of the operating and non-operating expenditures.The INVEST in Our Home for Life initiative is a $300 million initiative aimed at providing quality infrastructure, vibrant neighborhoods and quality housing, enhanced recreational opportunities, and new public safety facilities among others. As part of this initiative $200 million will be provided to complete funding of new roadways, improvement of current roadways, and current traffic congestion in several areas through the county. Ten projects have been approved by the Board of County Commissioners. There are also district specific projects including the pavement of Memorial Cemetery Road located in District 2. This project is budgeted at $45,000 and is pending construction approval.For more information regarding the INVEST in Our Home for Life initiative and the Public Works budget visit the initiative’s webpage found at http://orangecountyfl.net/. If you would like a more in-depth explanation of any of Orange County Government’s Financial Policies you can contact the Office of Management and Budget at (407) 836-7390 or see Orange County’s Administrative Regulations.You may also visit: http://www.ocfl.net/OpenGovernment/Budgets.aspx TAGSOrange County Commissioner Bryan NelsonOrange County Public Works Previous articleHow will Tractor Supply affect Apopka traffic?Next articleWater Managament District provides flooding info Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, read more

Central Florida Commission launches pilot program to house and employ homeless…

first_img UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Sadness of boy in the city Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Focus on Homelessness“Impact families” to address housing stability, employment, incomeFrom the CFF Staff The Central Florida Commission on Homelessness today announces the launch of Impact Families, a pilot program intended to test and evaluate a new system of care for families who find themselves homeless in our region.The demonstration pilot will focus on increasing housing stability for families through a strong focus on employment and education that aligns with the Housing First model. The pilot will first take place in Orange and Osceola counties.“Our community has challenged itself to find a better way to support our families in need of a stable place to live,” says Dick Batchelor, chair of the family committee of the Central Florida Commission on Homelessness. “Our committee has done the research and we’re ready to demonstrate how we can provide more targeted, client-focused support to our families who need it the most.”“Thanks to the work of Dick Batchelor and the Family Homelessness Committee of the Central Florida Commission on Homelessness, we’ve gained invaluable insight into the very complex issue of family homelessness,” said Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs. “Above all, we know that having a stable, safe and nurturing place to live can make a profound difference in the lives of our children and families.”According to research from the Commission’s Family Committee, more than 10,000 school-age children were homeless in Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties during the 2016-2017 school year. The underlying issues of family homelessness in Central Florida are housing stability, employment and income. The pilot program will work with families to address these three key areas through a coordinated entry system. After an intake process, families will be assigned to a Rapid Rehousing program to meet their immediate needs. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply  “The beginning of this pilot program is the result of our community coming together to test strategies for solving the issue of family homelessness, a problem that affects us all. This will change the way that we help families in our community resulting in a culture shift that will lead to impactful results.”–Mark Brewer, president and CEO of Central Florida FoundationParticipants will then be matched with a jobs placement coordinator through Goodwill Industries of Central Florida, which has received a $355,000 grant from Central Florida Foundation to lead the employment piece of Impact Families. The organization will work with each individual to assess their skills and strengths, build an employment plan, and connect participants to employment, education and certification opportunities, or services for disabilities. This pilot will aim to place individuals in jobs in which they will excel, with the goal of increasing their income.“For many of our neighbors in need, getting a job or finding a better job is the missing link that empowers them to support themselves and their families,” said Bill Oakley, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries of Central Florida. “We’re proud to partner with the Commission to extend new opportunities to those who are homeless.”Central Florida Foundation will manage and evaluate the grant-making for this pilot against criteria approved by the Central Florida Commission on Homelessness. The Foundation has managed the investments in the Housing First initiative with more than $7 million in contributions to the Homeless Impact Fund at the Foundation. The Housing First initiative has built a system for housing the community’s most vulnerable chronically homeless individuals.“The beginning of this pilot program is the result of our community coming together to test strategies for solving the issue of family homelessness, a problem that affects us all,” says Mark Brewer, president and CEO of Central Florida Foundation. “This will change the way that we help families in our community resulting in a culture shift that will lead to impactful results.”In addition to the efforts of Goodwill, Homeless Services Network and the Corporation for Supportive Housing will convene a cohort of nonprofit organizations and local governments. The cohort will gather case managers, employment specialists and other resource providers once a month over a one-year period. The partners will focus on a variety of topics relevant to their work, including trauma-informed care, motivational interviewing, resource mapping and case discussions. This effort will work to align service providers around the Housing First model as it relates to families.In addition to their decades long support of children and families read more

Study: Endangered Species Sensitive to Climate Change Lack Protection

first_imgBy Trimmel Gomes, Public News Service – FLTALLAHASSEE — A new study shows the federal government charged with protecting endangered species doesn’t have enough protection in place for those at greatest risk from climate change. TAGSClimate ChangeEndangered SpeciesPublic News Service – FL Previous articleThe Prohibition-era origins of the modern craft cocktail movementNext articleBrush Up On Your Pet Dental Knowledge With Pet Supermarket Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear The Roseate Spoonbill (pictured) is among the species listed as endangered. (via flickr/MyFWCmedia) Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 The research published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Climate Change found 99.8% of the 459 U.S. animal species listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act are at risk of having their populations further diminished by a changing climate. The study’s lead author Aimee Delach, senior policy analyst for climate adaptation with Defenders of Wildlife, said she examined the agencies in charge of managing conservation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service.“To see whether they are saying, yes, we should have some climate change actions to protect the species,” Delach said, “and we found that only 18% of species had those – had any of those kinds of actions planned.”The agencies have not yet responded to the study. Delach said Florida already had a large number of endangered species that have been impacted by climate change, well before her research.Defenders of Wildlife included a free interactive web application with data results from the study. Delach said anyone concerned can easily look up which species are in jeopardy and what’s being done to protect them.“We evaluated 47 species from Florida. We found that climate change was discussed as a threat for 25 of them, not mentioned in 22 of them. But only 10 of those species were actions described,” she said.Delach noted Florida is about average compared with other states. She said her team’s review looked through all available government documents relating to species up to the end of 2018. She added there have been updates with additional data and information for 2019 that could show improvements. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img