Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast — February 8, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest 180208_RyanMartinCold air in today as moves across the state and sets up in southeast Ohio by this evening. Temps are below zero this morning in parts of NW Ohio Still, though, the story is what happens in terms of snow tomorrow.Snow moves back into northern Ohio tomorrow morning and continues through the day. Models are at odds over this system, with one model saying 1-3 inches or perhaps slightly more in far northwest Ohio down to US 20. The other goes crazy, bringing 8-12 inch snow totals all the way down to US 30. The interesting thing is, the model that is usually overzealous on snow is the one being conservative, and the one that has the poorest track record at catching heavy snow events is the one that is going over the top. The answer likely lies in the middle. We look for snow to be in the 5-8 inch range from in NW Ohio 40 miles either side of US 20, and then lesser totals as you go south from there. This is truly a northern Ohio event, with nothing but flurries for your Friday south of US 30. This forecast is a step up from our previous discussions, but likely does no go as far as some other forecasts you may here today. In either case, gear up, because there will be some northern snow of some kind in the next 48 hours. A second wave of action comes for Saturday and Sunday, binging another 2-4 inches to the entire state of Ohio.Next week is drier, with bitter cold air in for Monday. Subzero temps are likely over almost all of the state north of I-70. After that cold start to the week, we have temps moderate a bit Tuesday, before clouds and colder air returns for Wednesday. High pressure dominates next Thursday and temps climb again on Friday. We do have some scattered light snow showers possible overnight Friday night into early Saturday, mostly over the northeast quarter of the state. On Saturday, we turn colder and drier again.The extended pattern is more active again, with 3 systems in 5 days. One on the 18th brings rain mixed with snow, and liquid equivalent precipitation of a quarter to half inch. On the 20th we see half to 1 inch of moisture coming through (liquid equivalent) and on the 21st we can see 1-2 inches of liquid, potentially coming as mostly snow. Then we are dry and cold through the 23rd.last_img

Ramya topples top seed Snehadevi after saving match points

first_imgAurangabad, Jun 6 (PTI) Teenagers Ramya Natarajan, Mahak Jain and Yubarani Banerjee created a big ripple at the USD 15,000 Endurance Aurangabad Open Womens ITF Tennis Championships here today.The biggest shock was rendered by Ramya who upset top seed Snehadevi Reddy in the singles first round at the EMMTC tennis courts, Divisional Sports Complex Garkheda.The 18-year-old left hander eight match points to record the biggest upset of the event by knocking out Snehadevi Reddy 4-6 6-37-6(7) in a 3 hour long battle.Snehadevi led 5-4 and 40-30 in the deciding set and 6-1 and 7-6 in the tiebreaker before her Chennai-based opponent came back to topple her.Third seed Sowjanya Bavisetti also bit the dust, losing to Mahak, runner-up at the Asian Juniors in Pune last week, in straight sets in 77 minutes while 16-year-old Yubarani packed off no. 4 seed Fiona Codino of France, also in straight sets, in 75 minutes.Seventeen-year-old Snehal Mane, the local wild card, put out qualifier Advaita Saravanan 7-6(3) 4-6 6-2 to enter the round of sixteen.In one of the best contested matches of the day, Britains Manisha Foster scraped past Kanika Vaidya 7-6(3) 2-6 7-5 in a 2 hour, 52 minute battle.Fifth seeded Nidhi Chilumula, seventh seeded Pranjala Yadlapalli, wildcard Rutuja Bhosale , Germanys Vivien Klein and Chinas second seeded Xiaoxi Zhao were the other players to move into the second round.Results:Singles (1st round): Ramya Natarajan (IND) bt Snehadevi Reddy (IND) [1] 4-6,6-4,7-6(6); Yubarani Banerjee (IND) bt Fiona Codino (FRA) [4] 6-1,6-3; Nidhi Chilumula (IND) [5] bt Shivani Manjanna (IND) 6-2 6-2; Rutuja Bhosale (IND) bt Tejasvi Kate (IND) 6-1 6-4; Pranjala Yadlapalli (IND) [7] bt Swara Kulkarni (IND) 6-2 6-1; Vivien Klein (GER) bt Hsin-Yuan Shih (TPE) 6-4 6-4; Manisha Foster (GBR) bt Kanika Vaidya (IND) 7-6(3) 2-6 7-5; Mahak Jain (IND) bt Sowjanya Bavisetti (IND) [3] 6-2,6-0; Snehal Mane (IND) bt Advaita Saravanan (IND) 7-6(3) 4-6 6-2; Xiaoxi Zhao (CHN) [2] bt Rishika Sunkara (IND) 6-4 7-5.advertisementDoubles (1st round): Manisha Foster (GBR) [4] / Alexandra Walters (AUS) bt Aastha Dargude / Arthi Muniyan (IND) 6-1 6-4; Kaaviya Balasubramanian (IND) / Shivani Manjanna (IND) bt Lalita Devarakonda / Saumya Vig (IND) 7-6(2) 6-3; Rushmi Chakravarthi / Sai Samhitha Chamarthi bt Vasavi Ganesan (IND)/ Advaita S Saravanan 6-0 6-3. PTI SSR NSKlast_img

Australia to create its own space agency for economic boost

first_imgCANBERRA, Australia – Australia announced on Monday it will create its own space agency to increase its share of the $330 billion space economy.Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the agency would be part of Australia’s development of an innovation and science economy. But the government has provided few specifics.“It’s a small agency to co-ordinate and lead,” Turnbull told reporters. “The space sector, of course, is one of enormous potential.”Acting Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science Michaelia Cash said the agency’s charter would be developed by the end of March.“The global space industry is growing rapidly and it’s crucial that Australia is part of this growth,” Cash said in a statement.“A national space agency will ensure we have a strategic long-term plan that supports the development and application of space technologies and grows our domestic space industry,” she added.The opposition Labor Party said such an agency was needed to increase Australia’s share of a global space economy from less than 1 per cent of what the government estimates is worth $330 billion.Labour said Australia and Iceland were the only countries in the 35-member Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development that do not have a space agency.Australia in 1967 became one of the first countries to launch a satellite and images of astronaut Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon were transmitted by NASA’s Honeysuckle Creek tracking station in Australia.But successive governments have baulked at establishing a space agency because of cost. The government has yet to announce how much it will invest in the new agency.last_img

Air Canada and Jazz parent extend agreement securing regional airlines future

first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:AC, TSX:CHR)The Canadian Press MONTREAL — Air Canada and Chorus Aviation Inc. have extended a purchase agreement by 10 years that will see Chorus subsidiary Jazz Aviation LP continue to provide Canada’s biggest airline with regional service through to 2035.Analysts say the deal will quell concerns around Chorus’s future after Air Canada announced last February it would expand its Rouge fleet and fly the lower-cost airplanes on Canadian regional routes — Jazz’s traditional stomping grounds.Chorus says the agreement, announced Monday, will grow its revenues by $940 million for a contracted total of $2.5 billion in aircraft leasing and fixed fees over the next 17 years. The deal also amends a 2015 agreement by lowering the fixed fees and incentive revenue Chorus receives by about $50 million annually.Under the new contract, Air Canada will make an equity investment of $97.3 million in Chorus, giving the carrier about 9.99 per cent of Chorus’s Class A and Class B voting shares, cumulatively.Chorus aims to put some of the proceeds from the investment to its leasing business, facilitating the purchase of new, larger-gauge aircraft, including nine CRJ900s in 2020.Chorus, a Halifax-based holding company, saw its stock shoot up 15 per cent to $7.21 from $6.29 in midday trading following the announcement.last_img

June building numbers double yeartodate construction value in Fort St John

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The city of Fort St. John has released building numbers for the month of June which show that the value of construction last month more than doubled the year-to-date total.According to the statistics for June, construction was started on eleven projects, with a total value of $7,699,000.At the end of May, the total value of construction in the Energetic City was $7,251,650, which means that the total value of construction so far this year now totals $14,950,650. Though last month’s statistics are encouraging, 2018 is so far on track to be a slower year than last year, when the year-to-date construction value at this time was $17,499,500.So far in 2018, there have been 49 building permits in the city, most of which are for commercial construction or for garage/renovations.Last month, the majority of permits were issued for renovations, but the big increase in value came from multiple-family home and industrial construction.The largest project started in June was an industrial project by Urban Systems in the 9100 block of 77th Ave. worth just under $4.2 million.Another $2 million project was begun in the 11500 block of 91st Ave., while a multi-family home at 8303 92 Ave. was valued at $1 million.With the big increase in construction value, the City saw a big jump in revenues compared to the month prior. Last month, the City saw revenues of $70,820.90 from permits and charges, bringing the year-to-date total to $119,707.90.Despite the large increase, revenues from permits and fees are still $50,000 less than at this point a year ago.last_img

Heres an updated list of official candidates in this years municipal elections

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – After the nomination period for next month’s municipal elections in B.C. officially opened one week ago, there have been a number of changes to the lists of candidates that have submitted their nomination papers in communities across Northeast B.C.According to CivicInfoBC, which operates as an information hub for all local governments in the province, candidates have officially submitted papers in five out of eight municipalities in Northeast B.C. Candidates have so far been posted by Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, Chetwynd, Pouce Coupe, Fort Nelson, and Tumbler Ridge while none have been posted yet in Taylor and Hudson’s Hope.As of 10:00 a.m. Tuesday, there are eight candidates running to become a councillor in Fort St. John, while mayor Lori Ackerman is still the only declared candidate for mayor. All current incumbent councillors with the lone exception of Trevor Bolin have filed their nomination papers, along with Becky Grimsrud, Tony Zabinsky, and Justin Jones. In Dawson Creek, incumbent mayor Dale Bumstead is still the only mayoral candidate that has submitted nomination papers.As for the rest of Council, incumbents Charlie Parslow, Shaely Wilbur, Cheryl Shuman, and Paul Gevatkoff are officially running for re-election along with newcomer Jerimy Earl.In Chetwynd, the list of candidates has grown to five: four for council and one for mayor. Councillor Alec Brownlee has officially submitted nomination papers to be elected as the District’s next mayor, while incumbent Merlin Nichols, who has been the District’s mayor since 2011, has not yet officially submitted his nomination. Incumbent councillors Rochelle Galbraith and Mel Deck are officially running for re-election, along with newcomers Jocelyn Disher and Janet Wark.Hudson’s Hope looks to be getting a new mayor as Dave Heiberg is the only candidate to have so far submitted paperwork. The District’s Chief Electoral Officer Tammy McKeon said that current mayor Gwen Johansson has verbally indicated that she will not be running for re-election.The race for District Council currently only has three official candidates: incumbents Kelly Miller and Mattias Gibbs, along with newcomer Val Pace.In the Northern Rockies Regional Municipality, there are six candidates currently officially running, five of whom are incumbents. Incumbent councillors Kyle Andrews, Laurie Dolan, Lorraine Gerwing, and Danny Soles have submitted their nomination papers. Bill Streeper, who has served as mayor since 2008, is officially running for re-election. He faces a challenge from Gary Foster, who was elected to both Fort Nelson Village Council and the former Fort Nelson-Liard Regional District Board in 1999, serving for only that year.In Pouce Coupe, the list of candidates has dropped from four to three after councillor Andre Lavoie withdrew his bid so unseat Lorraine Michetti from the mayor’s chair. Meanwhile, incumbent councillor Barbara Smith is seeking re-election along with Donna White, who was elected to public office prior to 2014.So far, only two incumbents have submitted nomination papers in Taylor: mayor Rob Fraser and councillor Betty Ponto.Tumbler Ridge currently has the most number of officially-declared candidates in Northeast B.C.: four candidates for mayor and six candidates for council. Of the four mayoral candidates, only two previously served on District Council in the community: incumbent mayor Don McPherson and former councillor Jerrilyn Schembri. The two are joined by Garret Golhof and Keith Bertrand, neither of whom has been previously elected to public office.center_img Monty Hendrickson, Bernie Lehmann, Curtis Miedzinski, and Chris Norbury have thrown their hats in the ring to become councillors, along with incumbents Darryl Krakowka and Joanne Kirby.In the Peace River Regional District, the only official candidates so far are the four incumbent Electoral Area Directors: Karen Goodings, Brad Sperling, Leonard Hiebert, and Dan Rose.The nomination period officially closes at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, September 14th.last_img

A terrible decision

first_imgThere is a whole host of implications and reasons to criticise the Central government’s move to ban civilian traffic movement on the nearly 300 km-stretch from Udhampur to Baramulla districts of National Highway 44 in Kashmir from 4 am to 5 pm every Sunday and Wednesday till May 31. A massive contingent of forces in small units have been deployed along the highway to enforce the ban. This decision is explained to be with the purpose of facilitating the movement of army and paramilitary convoys (they could have been airlifted) into Kashmir valley so as to ensure smooth conduct of the approaching general elections. This highway is the only stretch of road that connects Kashmir valley to mainland India. Naturally, this leads to significant disruption in the life of a common Kashmiri and also of every other civilian that would travel on that road. The plight of the local people is more serious as it covers a range of genuine situations such as medical patients, school children, traders and business owners, farmers and horticulturists, regular employees and even drivers of public transport. Also Read – A compounding difficulty Even before this highway ban draws criticism regarding its various impacts (which have already started to show since Sunday), a more legitimate and obvious question that must be raised is that why is there just one real connecting channel to India’s most strategic location. Kashmir is not a region to quarantine for its volatility for which successive Union governments have been responsible. As resolution of a dispute can have more than one ways, a territory can be brought closer by more ways than one. It stands obvious and emphasised that capitalising a situation for the gain of predominant politics takes a heavy toll on the common man. Apart from the disruption of day-to-day life of the common civilian, the economic impact of this ill-thought and senseless order on the region at large is a serious one. Kashmir was in the process of recovering from the losses from prolonged shut-down during the uprising following militant Burhan Wani’s elimination in July 2016 , and the massive floods that ravaged the region in September 2014. As trade will suffer massively, the regional economy is bound to take a hit in this election-centric politics. This short-term preventive measure will only add to the long-term detriment the Indian state has fomented in Kashmir.last_img

Cong govt will order comprehensive probe into Rafale deal Singhvi

first_imgNew Delhi: A “comprehensive inquiry” will be ordered into the Rafale deal after the Congress comes to power at the Centre, senior party leader Abhishek Manu Singhvi said, indicating a criminal probe could be conducted into the multi-billion dollar contract.The role of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, other government functionaries and private people will be probed, he said and exuded confidence that a Congress-led government will formed after the election results are out. “The day we come to power, just like in 72 hours or three days, loan waivers were taken care of in states (of Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Chhattisgarh), you will have a comprehensive inquiry. We have, in fact, asked for a JPC, but really speaking even an FIR and a criminal inquiry is not out of place,” he told PTI in an interview. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra SinghAsked if the Rafale issue has struck a chord with the people on the ground, Singhvi said one would have to wait and watch for it but he was confident that people do feel “cheated”. “I have no doubt that somewhere in the psyche of the people it is embedded that yahaan daal mein kala nahin daal hi kaali hai (not just something, but everything seems to be fishy about the deal),” he said. On whether the Rafale deal will be probed if the Congress comes to power, Singhvi said Congress president Rahul Gandhi has already said so earlier. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroad”You can stonewall as much as you like. This is quicksand, the more you struggle the more you will get sucked inside,” he said. The Congress has alleged irregularities in the Rafale deal and claimed that Prime Minister Modi and Union ministers as well as private players were complicit in the “scam”. However, the government has dismissed the allegations of any wrongdoing in the deal with France for 36 Rafale fighter jets. On the issue of Election Commission’s alleged inaction and delay in ruling on complaints of poll code violations by Modi and BJP chief Amit Shah, Singhvi said the Congress has made 10 representations to the EC starting April 1 only related to the duo. All the 10 representations can be categorised into three categories –hate statements, dragging armed forces into cheap political debate and campaigning right next to the booth or around the booth which Modi has done in earlier years as well, Singhvi said. “How is it possible that the same EC which bans on the same principle Yogi Adityanath does nothing for 30 long days (against PM and Shah). We have told the EC why are you not deciding. We also added that non-decision is a decision itself,” the Rajya Sabha MP said. PTIlast_img

Bucks land in the swamp for top10 matchup

Four years ago, in his freshman season, David Lighty and the Ohio State men’s basketball team traveled to play at the University of Florida. “I really didn’t know what to expect going down there my first time.” said Lighty, now in his senior season. “We knew they were good, but when you get down there, it’s kind of unreal, the support they have from all their fans.” Now, with a new batch of freshmen making their first road trip, No. 4 OSU returns to Gainesville to play the No. 9 Gators at 6 p.m. tonight. After an exhibition against Walsh and the season opener last Friday against North Carolina A&T, Florida will be the first ranked opponent the Buckeyes have played this year, something that excites coach Thad Matta. “This will be a great test,” Matta said. “They’re a very experienced team with everybody back. Going on the road with six new guys, you’re looking at a Big Ten type of game.” Despite returning four starters from a season ago, the talk surrounding this Buckeye team remains focused on the newcomers. Freshman Jared Sullinger started alongside Lighty, seniors Dallas Lauderdale and Jon Diebler, and junior William Buford against both Walsh and A&T last week. Though the lineup is by no means set in stone, Matta said he feels comfortable starting those five and plans to do so tonight. Though Sullinger might continue to get starts, freshmen Deshaun Thomas and Aaron Craft have been just as good so far. In the 102-56 win over North Carolina A&T, Thomas scored 24 points, and Craft handed out nine assists, both team highs, despite playing just 20 and 22 minutes, respectively. Craft, who is the only true point guard the Buckeyes have, will likely see the most playing time at that position as the season progresses. Although Buford started last week, it was Craft who seemed most comfortable. Often, both Buford and Craft were on the floor at the same time, with Buford moving off the ball as a shooting guard, his natural position. Diebler, who was coached by Craft’s father in middle school, said he doesn’t expect the freshman to be fazed tonight. “I’ve known him since he was in like third grade,” Diebler said. “Aaron’s a kid who’s so mature for his age. You see how he plays — he’s tough. He knows what we’re going up against and knows that it’s going to be a tough game for us. I know he’ll be ready.” Although Diebler was quick to praise Craft and the rest of the freshmen, he knows a road game against a top-10 team is like nothing the new class has faced before. Unfortunately, Diebler said, there isn’t much his younger teammates can do to prepare. “You can’t prepare for the crowd being loud and everyone against you,” Diebler said. “Just the mindset of going on the road has to be different. You really have to come focused.” As hard as it is, Matta was cautiously optimistic that his team will be ready. “I’ll probably know in the locker room before the game,” he said. “They’ve been pretty focused, and we’ve talked a lot about that there’s two types of teams that go on the road, one that goes to have fun and one that goes on a business trip.”

Urban Meyer Were forever indebted to Ohio State footballs 2012 senior class

Urban Meyer admittedly gets emotional when talking about this season’s seniors. Tears, hugs and smiles all are commonplace between coaches and their outgoing players in collegiate athletics. But for the 48-year-old OSU coach, this year’s group of Buckeye seniors is far more than a typical graduating class. They helped save the Buckeye football program, Meyer says. “We’re forever indebted to them because they didn’t have to do what they did,” Meyer said Monday in a press conference previewing Saturday’s game against Michigan. What the first-year Buckeye coach is talking about is this: OSU’s 2012 senior class didn’t have to be here, playing for a team ineligible for the postseason even though they’re 11-0 and ranked No. 4 by the Associated Press. When OSU was hit with a bowl and conference championship ban in December 2011 because of the “Tattoo-Gate” scandal that rocked Buckeye Nation to its core a year before, this class of seniors was given a way out. They could have transferred to another school – a bowl-eligible one at that – and played immediately. That fact concerned Meyer greatly. “I still remember the day we walked in, and (OSU athletic director Gene Smith) said, ‘You’re not going to a bowl game,’” Meyer said. “I thought, ‘We’re not what?’ And then my mind started thinking about this year’s team.” Above everything else, Meyer began to strategize how he would compel the seniors-to-be to stay at OSU. He said he called a team meeting 15 minutes after the Buckeyes learned they were banned from the 2012 postseason. After the meeting, Meyer kept the seniors-to-be in the room to try to convince them to stay at OSU. It was easier than he thought it would be. “I had no idea who they were, and they didn’t know me, so it was a leap of faith (for them to stay),” Meyer said. “I think it was also their love for their school.” Almost a year after that meeting, Meyer realizes he was right. “Now that I know them, I know exactly why they stayed,” Meyer said. “Their love for Ohio State.” Most of this season’s OSU seniors didn’t consider leaving Columbus for a second. Defensive end John Simon could have left for the NFL and been an early-round draft pick. A handful of other then-juniors had favorable other destinations, too. They remained Buckeyes. “I don’t think it crossed anyone’s mind to leave,” said senior defensive back Zach Domicone. That doesn’t mean they weren’t upset when they realized their final season as college athletes would be bowl-less, however. Most of the OSU seniors were together when they heard the ill-fated news. “Looking back, we were in the hospital visiting patients and stuff and that’s when it broke. So, it was on the TV’s and on ESPN and people were like, ‘How do you guys feel that you can’t play in a bowl game?’ and we were like, ‘What are you talking about?’” Domicone said. When they returned to the Woody Hayes Athletic Center to hear the news again as a team, there was anger, confusion and disbelief spreading throughout the meeting room. “It was kind of one of those things where you sit down and just let it sink in for a little while,” said senior linebacker Zach Boren. The team was, after all, repeatedly told by OSU athletic personnel that a postseason ban was not going to be inflicted. “We were kind of told that we weren’t going to get a bowl ban, that everything was going to be OK,” Boren said. “We had heard from people who had done investigations and stuff that we were going to be all right and that what we already imposed was going to be more than enough.” It wasn’t, and OSU now sits as one of two remaining unbeaten teams in the country – Notre Dame being the other – with one game to play in the regular season. Unlike the Fighting Irish, though, the Buckeyes’ season will end after its game Saturday, and with it, the careers of 22 OSU seniors. That last game on Saturday should be special, however. OSU faces its archrival, No. 20-ranked Michigan, or, as those associated with the Buckeye football program call them, ‘that school up north.’ With a win against the Wolverines, OSU would attain its first undefeated season since 2002 – the most recent Buckeyes’ National Championship squad, which will be honored at half time of the game Saturday. A shot at an AP national championship would remain possible, too. Not a bad way for OSU’s seniors to go out, especially after the 6-7 season the Buckeyes had last year. “We wanted to leave our mark and leave a legacy and last year didn’t really go how we planned and I don’t think anyone wanted to go out like that,” Domicone said. Along with possibly leaving OSU following a 12-0 season, the 2012 seniors have the Buckeye football program headed in the right direction, and that is something they are proud of. “We were just talking about that, a couple of (the seniors). We were just saying how different it’s read more