Limerick remembers Orlando victims

first_imgNewsLocal NewsLimerick remembers Orlando victimsBy Alan Jacques – June 13, 2016 945 Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Advertisement Linkedin Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live WhatsApp TAGSfeaturedLGBTIlimerickOrlando Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Facebookcenter_img AN online book of condolences in memory of the victims of the Orlando shooting tragedy will open at 10am, this Tuesday, June 14 on Limerick.ie/CouncilMeanwhile, the Limerick LGBTI community will hold a candlelight vigil in Arthur’s Quay Park this Wednesday, June 15 at 6.30pm.The vigil is being held in solidarity with families, friends, loved ones and LGBT+ community and wider community in Florida, and in solidarity with all the people around the world who have been and continue to be affected by terrorism and all forms of violence and oppression. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Members of the public are encouraged to bring a candle and rainbow colours, flags paint or clothing. All are welcome to attend. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleDouble first for Limerick poet Ron CareyNext articleAppeal to find woman (34) missing in Limerick Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Twitter WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Print Email Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clashlast_img

When tectonic plates began to shift

first_img From ancient flooding, modern insights Related An enduring question in geology involves the question of when the tectonic plates of the Earth’s crust began pushing and pulling in a process that formed the planet’s continents, oceans, and other landforms. Some researchers theorize it happened about 4 billion years ago. Others say it was closer to 1 billion.Clues can be found in very old rocks. Looking at some, a team led by Harvard researchers show that these plates were moving at least 3.2 billion years ago on the early Earth.In a portion of the Pilbara Craton in Western Australia, one of the oldest pieces of the Earth’s crust, scientists found a latitudinal drift of about 2.5 centimeters a year. They found the motion went back 3.2 billion years and confirmed it using a novel magnetic microscope.The researchers believe this shift is the earliest proof that modern-like plate motion happened between 2 and 4 billion years ago, suggesting that the plates pushed and pulled in ways unlike those seen earlier periods, when the Earth’s crust moved less. It adds to growing research that tectonic movement occurred on the early Earth and offers hints about the conditions under which the earliest forms of life developed.The work was published in Science Advances on Earth Day.“Basically, this is one piece of geological evidence to extend the record of plate tectonics on Earth further back in Earth history,” said Alec Brenner, one of the paper’s lead authors and a member Harvard’s Paleomagnetics Lab. “Based on the evidence we found, it looks like plate tectonics is a much more likely process to have occurred on the early Earth, and that argues for an Earth that looks a lot more similar to today’s than a lot of people think.”,Plate tectonics is key to the evolution of life and the development of the planet. Today, the Earth’s outer shell consists of about 15 shifting blocks of crust. On them sit the planet’s continents and oceans. As Earth formed, the plates drifted into each other and apart, exposing new rocks to the atmosphere, which led to chemical reactions that stabilized Earth’s surface temperature over billions of years. A stable climate is crucial to the evolution of life, and the study suggests that early forms of life came about in a more moderate environment.“We’re trying to understand the geophysical principles that drive the Earth,” said Roger Fu, one of the paper’s lead authors and an assistant professor of Earth and planetary sciences in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “Plate tectonics cycles elements that are necessary for life into the Earth and out of it.”Plate tectonics helps planetary scientists understand worlds beyond this one, too.“Currently, Earth is the only known planetary body that has robustly established plate tectonics of any kind,” said Brenner, a third-year graduate student in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. “It really behooves us as we search for planets in other solar systems to understand the whole set of processes that led to plate tectonics on Earth and what driving forces transpired to initiate it. That hopefully would give us a sense of how easy it is for plate tectonics to happen on other worlds, especially given all the linkages between plate tectonics, the evolution of life, and the stabilization of climate.”For the study, members of the project traveled to the Pilbara Craton. A craton is a primordial, thick, and very stable piece of crust. They are usually found in the middle of tectonic plates and are the ancient hearts of the Earth’s continents, which makes them the natural place to go to study the early Earth. The Pilbara Craton stretches about 300 miles across, covering approximately the same area as the state of Pennsylvania.Fu and Brenner drilled into rocks from a portion called the Honeyeater Basalt and collected core samples about an inch wide in 2017. They brought them back to Fu’s lab in Cambridge and placed them into magnetometers and demagnetizing equipment. Certain minerals in rocks lock in the direction and intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field at the time they are formed. That field shifts over time, so by examining layers, scientists glean evidence for a kind of timeline of when rocks were formed and when they shifted in the plates. These instruments told them the rock’s magnetic history — the most stable bit being when the rock formed, which was 3.2 billion years ago.,The team then used their data and data from other researchers, who have demagnetized rocks in nearby areas, to date when the rocks shifted from one point to another. They found a drift of 2.5 centimeters a year.Fu and Brenner’s work differs from most studies because the scientists focused on measuring the position of the rocks over time while other work tends to focus on chemical structures in the rocks that suggest tectonic movement.Researchers used the novel Quantum Diamond Microscope to confirm their findings. That read more

6 things #creditunions need to know about Prime Rate changes

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Cardholders will get higher interest rates on any outstanding balances, if their FIs choose to increase their rates.FIs may have to pay more when borrowing money to support growth.The Government is impacted by any resulting economic changes such as slowdowns in spending or housing growth.The Economy may dictate future rate changes based on how it responds to current rate changes. continue reading » In mid-December last year, the Federal Reserve raised its Prime Rate from 3.25 percent to 3.5 percent. This was a widely anticipated change many financial institutions (FIs) have already responded to by raising their own interest rates.Consumers and FIs alike can expect to hear more from the Fed in 2016. Already, the Fed is gearing up for additional Prime Rate increases, citing continued economic growth as a catalyst. Some analysts predict as many as four federal rate changes this year. In order to effectively respond to these changes, FIs should know, understand and remember the following six things:Who is affected by Prime Rate increases?last_img