BIG Something Shares “Tumbleweed”, The Debut Single From Their New Album [Premiere]

first_imgIt’s been nothing but an upward trajectory for BIG Something, the six piece rockers based out of North Carolina. The band continues to make a name for themselves with high energy performances, uniquely crafted setlists, and sensational songwriting abilities, fusing influences of rock, funk, jazz and more for a sound wholly their own. As the band continues to take the scene by storm, fans were recently treated to the good news that BIG Something would be releasing a new album, Tumbleweed, in early 2017.Due out February 24th, the new album will be the fourth release from this exciting six-piece group. The album itself takes on a darker tone than the band’s previous works, as singer Nick MacDaniels mentions in his discussion of the new release. “Tumbleweed is a post apocalyptic desert trip. It’s a little darker and heavier in tone and subject matter than our previous albums, but there are also a few bright spots and upbeat moments too. With all eight tracks having been ‘road tested’ for the past couple years, it’s a really nice snapshot of our sound and catalogue.”To get fans excited about the new release, BIG Something has offered Live For Live Music the first taste! We’re delighted to premiere the album’s title track “Tumbleweed,” which you can stream in the player below.“‘Tumbleweed’ is the album’s title track and inspiration for the cover art,” says MacDaniels. “The name tumbleweed refers to the main character of the song who is fumbling aimlessly through a post-apocalyptic desert wasteland hallucinating on peyote. He’s telling himself to just keep moving in order to survive.” The band’s drummer Ben Vinograd adds, “I love this song because it showcases the dynamic all the players in our band can bring to the table. From the opening line on, everyone has a chance to shine.”The whole band has a chance to shine on Tumbleweed, including Ben Vinograd (drums), Doug Marshall (bass), Josh Kagel (keys, trumpet), Casey Cranford (saxophone, EWI), Jesse Henlsey (lead guitar), and Nick MacDaniels (vocals, guitar). Recorded at the beloved Echo Mountain Asheville studios with Grammy-nominated producer John Custer, we can’t wait for the new album to be released!BIG Something’s new album Tumbleweed is due out on February 24th, 2017, and you can pre-order the disc here. Check out the band’s upcoming tour schedule below, and head to their official website for any information you need!BIG Something Tour Dates12/29 – Washington, DC @ 9:30 Club12/31 – Raleigh, NC @ Lincoln Theatre1/18 – Key West, FL @ Green Parrot1/19 – Key West, FL @ Green Parrot1/20 – 1/25 – Jam Cruise 151/26 – Savannah, GA @ Barrelhouse South1/27 – Atlanta, GA @ Smith’s Old Bar1/28 – Greenville, SC @ Independent Public Alehouse2/2 – Chattanooga, TN @ Revelry Room2/3 – Birmingham, AL @ Workplay2/4 – Nashville, TN @ 12th & Porter2/10 – Columbia, SC @ New Brookland Tavern2/11 – Boone, NC @ The Local2/15 – New York, NY @ Arlene’s Grocery2/16 – Bridgeport, CT @ The Acoustic2/24 – Greensboro, NC @ Blind Tiger (CD Release Party)2/25 – Greensboro, NC @ Blind Tiger (CD Release Party)3/1 – Columbus, OH @ Scarlet & Grey3/9 – Jackson Hole, WY @ Pink Garter3/10 – Sandpoint, ID @ The Hive3/11 – Sandpoint, ID @ The Hive3/14 – Boulder, CO @ Fox Theatre3/17 – Steamboat Springs, CO @ Schmiggity’s3/18 – Frisco, CO @ Barkley Ballroom3/21 – Avon, CO @ Agave3/22 – Fort Collins, CO @ Aggie Theatre3/23 – Denver, CO @ Bluebird Theater3/24 – Telluride, CO @ The Sheridan Opera House3/25 – Telluride, CO @ The Sheridan Opera House3/26 – Winter Park, CO @ Ullrs Tavern5/5 – Wilmington, NC @ Greenfield Lake Amphitheater7/27 – Floyd, VA @ FloydFest7/28 – Floyd, VA @ FloydFestlast_img

Paraguay looks to modernize its fighter planes to face new threats

first_imgInspired by the Cuban guerrillas and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the group is of concern to security agencies and is a challenge to the Armed Forces. In addition, there is the continuing use of the nation’s air space as a flight corridor for illegal trafficking operations, especially for smuggling drugs. Brazil’s “Abatement Act” and Argentina’s increased policing of its airspace along its borders have caused drug traffickers from Brazil, Argentina or Bolívia to choose to fly their planes over Paraguay. GAT is divided into three squadrons: the First Fighter Squadron “Guaraní,” which operated AT-26 Xavante planes; the Second Fighter Squadron “Indios,” which operated AT-33 planes; and the Reconnaissance and Attack Squadron “Moros,” currently designed the Third Fighter Squadron, which operates AT-27 Tucano planes. It is the unit’s only squadron that is currently active and is considered an elite force. The agency responsible for controlling and monitoring the nation’s airspace is called CIVA (Comprehensive Air Monitoring Center). The process of modernization requires that over the next year, the air force obtain at least two of the four planned three-dimensional, long-range radars, capable of covering the country’s entire territory. Today, there is still a deficiency in this area, with several regions without radar coverage, a situation that has been exploited by drug traffickers who are able to fly there without being detected. By Dialogo October 31, 2014 Even without the circumstances being ideal to fulfill its Constitutional mission as fully as necessary, the Paraguayan Air Force is continually preparing its aviators for a future that, who knows, may not be that far away, when it will be equipped to the highest level of the country’s strategic ambitions, recognizing its importance for maintaining regional security, protecting the nation’s borders, keeping the peace and ensuring the national sovereignty of the skies over Paraguay. Inspired by the Cuban guerrillas and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the group is of concern to security agencies and is a challenge to the Armed Forces. In addition, there is the continuing use of the nation’s air space as a flight corridor for illegal trafficking operations, especially for smuggling drugs. Brazil’s “Abatement Act” and Argentina’s increased policing of its airspace along its borders have caused drug traffickers from Brazil, Argentina or Bolívia to choose to fly their planes over Paraguay. Silvio Pettirossi International Airport bears the name of the pioneer and patron of aviation in Paraguay. Its entrance is located off one of the main roads in Asunción, called “Aviadores del Chaco,” in memory of the brave pilots who fought in the war against Bolivia and entered the continent’s military history by conducting the first night bombing mission and engaging in the first aerial combat in the Americas. While Paraguay currently has the weakest air force in the region in material terms, the same cannot be said of it in terms of human talent. The FAP has a team of courageous and highly-motivated pilots, many of them trained at foreign air force academies. Several are graduates of the Brazilian Air Force Academy in Pirassununga (SP), and others had the opportunity to take the FAB fighter pilot in Natal. All of these factors are worrisome to the country’s government. According to information provided by Paraguayan authorities, President Horacio Cartes – who has a professional background in aeronautics – has recognized the need to modernize the Air Force, especially combat planes, in order to ensure that they are capable of fulfilling their Constitutional mission. As is true of many countries, historical aviation events are a source of national pride in Paraguay. The area by the airport at Ñu Guasu (Guarani for “large field”) Air Base is home to, among other things, the First Brigade of the Paraguayan Air Force (FAP), which include the combat unit Aero Tactical Group (GAT), the only fighter plane unit in the country. While Paraguay currently has the weakest air force in the region in material terms, the same cannot be said of it in terms of human talent. The FAP has a team of courageous and highly-motivated pilots, many of them trained at foreign air force academies. Several are graduates of the Brazilian Air Force Academy in Pirassununga (SP), and others had the opportunity to take the FAB fighter pilot in Natal. Recently, CIVA has received two field radars that are able to detect targets at a distance of 104 km, at an altitude of up to 25 meters. One of them was installed at the same air base to support military organization operations, while the other was mounted on a truck adapted as a command station and mobile monitoring unit. This radar is frequently sent to the borders read more

LA Lakers’ improved effort does little in 105-93 loss to LA Clippers

first_imgInstead of nursing as high as a 28-point deficit in a Christmas Day loss to the Clippers (31-16), the Lakers mostly played close until the Clippers converted 25 points off of their 17 turnovers. Lance Stephenson taunted the Lakers with a one-handed dunk, while DeAndre Jordan threw down a windmill in the waning minutes. Clippers point guard Chris Paul posted All-Star numbers (27 points, seven assists).But the Lakers showcased balanced offense between their youth (Julius Randle’s 23 points and 14 rebounds; Jordan Clarkson’s 17 points) and veterans (Roy Hibbert’s 12 points; Lou Williams’ 11 points). The Clippers’ J.J. Redick lacked shooting accuracy (2 of 10). And the Lakers outrebounded the Clippers, 48-38, despite Jordan grabbing 17 boards. “You can’t coach heart,” Scott said. “Effort is something you have to have inside you. You have to come out and compete every single night. Right now in our league, effort is a skill. Guys that play hard is a skill. That to me is what you’re supposed to do anyway.”The Lakers did not do that in a 23-point loss to Chicago, leading Scott to stew so much afterward that he considered pouring himself a glass or two. Maybe more.“I said, ‘I need to go get a drink. Then halfway home my girl said, ‘You really want that drink?’ I said, ‘No,’” Scott said. “But I was dead serious, I needed a drink. But I’m not in AA. I’m not in recovery from anything like that, so I was able to say no and just think about what we had to do.” Scott has occasionally said in jest he has considered drinking away his sorrows. It appears nothing has irritated him more than the Lakers’ defensive fortunes. They entered Friday’s game 27th out of 30 NBA teams in points allowed (106.4) and 26th in defensive field-goal percentage (46.6). Those numbers are actually slightly worse than last season’s defense that allowed an average of 105.3 points on a 46.6 percent clip. “We haven’t gotten our concepts down pat,” Scott said. We haven’t been able to do the little things on a nigh to night basis. I’ve asked our guys when is this going to sink in when you understand every night what you need to do on that end of the floor.”What did they say?“I didn’t get an answer. Everybody sat there,” Scott said. “They looked at me like I don’t know, coach. IT was a legit question. I am still waiting on an answer.”Scott did not receive much answers on that front against the Clippers. But at least he saw his players compete, something that will lessen the odds that he will become tempted to address his frustrations with a beverage. The debilitating losses bothered Byron Scott so much that he felt compelled to drink. The defensive execution became so awful that the Lakers’ coach often asked his players if he needed to change his preparation or schemes.Then, suddenly the Lakers turned in a competitive game and provided more of an effective punch than the Clippers’ Blake Griffin could throw this week.It did not change the bottom-line result. The Lakers still lost, 105-93, to the Clippers on Friday in a designated road game at Staples Center, marking the team’s ninth consecutive defeat.But in a season centered less on the Lakers’ win total (9-40) and more on their development, they offered some promising signs against their L.A. counterparts. center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img