Break Science To Team Up With Members Of The Disco Biscuits For [Br]eaking [Bi]scuits Run

first_imgIn October of 2016, Brooklyn Comes Alive brought together dozens of artists to play in never-before-formed supergroups for one night only in NYC. It was there that one of the most talked-about collaborations was born: [Br]eaking [Bi]scuits with Break Science’s Adam Deitch and Borahm Lee and The Disco Biscuits’ Marc Brownstein and Aron Magner. The debut performance was easily one of the most talked about musical experiences that came out of the day, ultimately inspiring the artists to come back together for a slew of dates this spring.[Br]eaking [Bi]scuits will play three shows this spring, including stops at the Westcott Theater in Syracuse, NY on 5/18, the Brooklyn Bowl in NYC on 5/19, and Gypsy Sallys in Washington, DC on 5/20.Says Brownstein of the project, “Playing with Adam and Borahm is a dream come true. These are two of the best musicians in the entire live and electronic music scene, and they have pushed the envelope to evolve the way people perceive what is possible to accomplish musically.”Adds Deitch, “Marc and Aron went from playing the Wetlands in the 90s, to curating one of the biggest and coolest festivals in the world, Camp Bisco! They have always had one foot in the electronic sound, and one foot in the jam!”Merging together the worlds of electronic, hip-hop, psychedelic grooves and heavy jams,  [Br]eaking [Bi]scuits is certainly not to be missed!5/18- Syracuse, NY Westcott Theater (tickets)5/19- Brooklyn, NY Brooklyn Bowl (tickets)5/20 – Washington, DC – Gypsy Sallys (tickets)last_img

Government Policy Thwarts Uptake of Renewables in Indonesia

first_imgGovernment Policy Thwarts Uptake of Renewables in Indonesia FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Mongobay:Demand for energy in China and Indonesia continues to drive the resurgence of the latter’s coal industry, setting back efforts in both countries to shift to a greater share of renewable energy.Mining, freight and trade executives were largely upbeat at what was billed as the coal industry’s biggest event of the year, the 24th Coaltrans Asia, on the Indonesian resort island of Bali earlier this month. Analysts who attended the three-day conference said the outlook in China was still very strong, especially for coal from Indonesia, one of the world’s biggest exporters of the fossil fuel.A major factor behind this trend is the growing domestic demand. At present, Indonesia’s coal-fired power plants require about 80 to 90 MMT of coal per year, or roughly 80 percent of the locally mined coal that is allocated for the domestic market.“Slowly but sure, we’re starting to prioritize domestic needs,” said Bambang, the energy ministry’s coal chief. “Based on the national development plan, the domestic market [for coal] has increased 27 percent each year, and in 2019, we hope it’ll increase by 60 percent.”Elrika Hamdi, an energy finance analyst from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), a Cleveland, Ohio-based think tank, noted that the 10-year business plan from state-owned power utility PLN indicated it was on a building spree: “there are going to be many new coal-fired plants operating in 2020 and 2021,” she said.Coal producers, she added, are “trying to dig as much coal as they can while it’s still possible. They’re capitalizing on the moment [when] the coal price is high, with the [Coaltrans Asia] conference saying the price will be stable or even have an upward trend.”The bullish outlook for coal, driven in large part by government policy, could spell trouble for the renewable energy market in Indonesia, which is already struggling to compete with the ubiquitous fossil fuel, analysts say.Indonesia will miss its target of generating 23 percent of its energy from new and renewable sources by 2025 unless it makes significant policy and regulatory changes, according to a report from the Geneva-based Global Subsidies Initiative (GSI) of the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD).“Many stakeholders we spoke to hold this view and have expressed concerns that the current policies do not provide enough incentive to grow renewables,” Richard Bridle, a senior policy adviser at GSI, said at the launch of the report in March. “More friendly regulations will be a critical first step to boosting renewable energy development in Indonesia and building a business case for investment.”But right now, the momentum and policy framework are not in favor of renewables — so much so that the coal industry players at the recent Bali conference said they didn’t see renewables as a competitive threat in the Indonesian market.“While speakers at the conference see renewables as a threat because prices for renewables have declined in the past 10 years, it’s not [considered] a threat for Indonesia,” Elrika said. “Even the government of Indonesia says it will still use coal as the base load power source.”More: In export- and domestic-driven coal boon, Indonesia neglects renewableslast_img

Anubha Ganguly proves age is just a number

first_imgBraving the barrier of age and ailment, the first CD containing folk songs by 83-year-old Anubha Ganguly will be released on June 7, in Kolkata by Governor KN Tripathi.At the age when most people complaint of ill health and loneliness, Ganguly’s amazing energy and undaunted courage stand as a source of great inspiration to the singers and musicians, who are much junior to her in age. The CD contains 10 popular folk songs including ‘Longor Chariya Naoer’, ‘Ki Ajob Karigor’, ‘Prem Janena Roshik Kalachand’, ‘Hosti Konya Hosti Konya’, ‘Kanai oo Kanai’, ‘Kunchboron shundor konya’, ‘O amar dorodi’, ‘Loke Bole Bolbe’, ‘Emon Premer Nodite Soigo’, ‘Ore Ore sundoira naoer majhi’. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfGanguly joined Gananatya Sangha, where she came in contact with the king of folk songs – Nirmalendu Chowdhury and became his first student. Her husband Gokulchand and brother –in- law also joined the choir. She took part in many shows and enthralled the audience. Undoubtedly, music was Anubha’s, first love. Though born in a well-settled family, Anubha being daughter of a cook, took her intial lessons in music from Krishna Chandra Dey – popularly known as KC Dey – who happened to be the uncle of Manna Dey. Dey had a baritone voice was a great exponent of Kirtan. Later, she learned music under the mentorship of renowned music teacher Yamini Gangopadhyay. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAnubha’s son actor-singer Arindam Ganguly said that despite being the mother of three children, which kept her busy looking after the day to day duties, she kept pursuing music and balancing her personal and professional life quite well. “This CD is my tribute to her,” he said. It was Biswa Roy, Head of Bhavna Cassettes and Records, who mooted the idea of making a CD of folk songs by an octogenarian vocalist, that will stand as an inspiration to the present day folk artists. Ganguly did not turn down Roy’s proposal, and yet has presented to us a unique CD with the inimitable style of singing.last_img