Harvard Food for Free Riders seek teammates

first_imgHarvard University is fielding a team of riders to raise money for Food for Free, a Cambridge-based  food rescue program. Harvard is a proud partner, donating more than 50,000 pounds of food to its efforts, annually.Consider joining the Harvard team on Sunday, September 25 riding in support of Food for Free’s work! Contributions are also greatly appreciated! Join the team: https://ride.threesquaresne.org/fundraise/team?ftid=79799 (The registration fee covers a portion of the ride set-up costs.)Ride bikes: For a beginner-friendly ride, choose the 10 mile route—most riders can complete this route in ~1.5 hours. For a longer, more challenging ride, sign up for 25 or 50 miles.Fight Hunger: Raise funds that help make fresh, healthy food accessible to everyone! All riders must fundraise a minimum of $250 (to cover expenses of the Ride otherwise charged back to Food for Free), but are asked to set a personal goal of $1,000.Questions or more information? Contact Crista Martin, Harvard University Dining Services, at 617-496-6705 or crista_martin@harvard.edu. Read Full Storylast_img

Planting for Drought Tolerance

first_imgWhile Georgia is not currently experiencing drought conditions, it still makes good environmental sense to select drought-tolerant larger shrubs as the cornerstones of your landscape design. University of Georgia horticulturist John Ruter, who directs the UGA Trial Gardens, has been breeding and cultivating plants for dry Georgia gardens for decades. He recommends Georgia gardeners consider conifers when they’re looking to add a drought-tolerant sense of heft to their landscapes. “Many conifers are naturally adapted to seasonal droughts or have evolved in areas where dry seasons regularly occur or rainfall is limited in general,” Ruter said. “They often have unique morphological characteristics such as needles, which help them conserve water from being lost from the foliage.” One new conifer variety that Ruter bred himself at UGA — a drought-tolerant bottlebrush bush called “Scarlet Torch” — recently made “Today’s Garden Center’s” list of new drought-tolerant plants for summer 2014. “This new drought-tolerant variety has the largest bright red flowers we’ve seen on any bottlebrush and is irresistible to hummingbirds,” noted the magazine. If a bottlebrush bush won’t work in your garden, Ruter has several other drought-tolerant selections that have proven themselves tough enough to stand up to Georgia summers. His list includes the following shrubs: Calocedrus decurrens – California Incense Cedar: native to California and Nevada, this wonderfully fragrant conifer comes from areas that receive lots of snowfall, but very little rain. It is best used as an upright growing tree in the northern half of Georgia. Cedrus atlantica – Atlas Cedar: native to Eurasia, this needled conifer is best used in the upper south. Slow growing but worth the effort. The cultivar ‘Glauca Pendula’ has blue foliage and a wonderful weeping habit. Cedrus deodara – Deodar Cedar: native to the Himalayan regions of southeast Asia, numerous selections of this plant are available. It grows upright and spreading with blue or gold foliage. ‘Gold Cone’ is Ruter’s personal favorite. Cunninghamia lanceolata – China Fir: relatively common on older home sites in the South, this plant is fast growing, large and comes with green or blue foliage. It develops a large multitrunk tree with time. Try ‘Chason’s Gift’ or ‘Samurai.’Cupressus arizonica var. glabra – Arizona Cypress: becoming more popular in the landscape, this plant grows in the mountains of Arizona where it receives monsoonal rain showers in the summer. ‘Chaparral’ and ‘Limelight’ are two popular cultivars.Cupressus sempervirens – Italian Cypress: the pencil of the conifer world, this plant is known for its very upright growth habit. It performs best on drier sites where temperatures don’t drop below 5 degrees F.Juniperus chinensis – Chinese Juniper: this very tough plant comes in a variety of growth habits (upright and spreading) and a variety of foliage colors (green, yellow, and blue). It’s very drought tolerant when established.Juniperus conferta – Shore Juniper: grows along the sandy beaches of Japan. It’s an excellent ground cover for well-drained slopes or beachside locations. ‘All Gold” and ‘Silver Spreader’ are two great cultivars.Juniperus horizontalis – Creeping Juniper: is the prototype ground cover conifer for use in landscape. It usually has a very prostrate growth habit and requires low to no maintenance.Pinus palustris – Longleaf Pine: a long-needled pine native to the southeastern United States, this tree performs well in most of Georgia, except the high mountains. The juvenile or “grass stage” can be used in large containers. For more advice from UGA Extension experts on drought tolerant and water-saving landscape plants search drought tolerant at extension.uga.edu/publications/.last_img

Salvadoran Counterterrorism Command: Fighting Threats for 30 Years

first_imgDuring the 2014 iteration hosted by Colombia, CEAT representatives competed against counterparts from 17 countries in the Americas and placed third, but the unit previously won the championship in 2004 and again in 2011, when El Salvador hosted the event. The Salvadoran Military’s Special Counterterrorism Command (CEAT) is an elite unit that protects the nation from the tentacles of transnational terrorism and narcotrafficking. The elite unit is so effective because it is an integrated unit of officers, non-commissioned officers, and a troop of Special Forces members focused mainly on urban area combat. Here, Special Operations units converge in the fields of counterterrorism, counter subversion, airborne, air mobility, and Special Forces operations. The physically demanding competition showcases the skills of its contestants, encourages camaraderie among participants, and promotes military-to-military relationships, increased interoperability and improved regional security. They are also connected to the work the elite units perform in the field. Victories in the ‘Fuerzas Comando’ competitions The elite unit is so effective because it is an integrated unit of officers, non-commissioned officers, and a troop of Special Forces members focused mainly on urban area combat. Here, Special Operations units converge in the fields of counterterrorism, counter subversion, airborne, air mobility, and Special Forces operations. Victories in the ‘Fuerzas Comando’ competitions The Salvadoran Military’s Special Counterterrorism Command (CEAT) is an elite unit that protects the nation from the tentacles of transnational terrorism and narcotrafficking. “The Military has always inspired confidence in us. When we see them on buses, we know that we are being protected,” said Soraya de Martínez, a resident of Soyapango municipality, where the CEAT provides security. “They are very well trained, and we are happy that they’re on the buses with the people.” By Dialogo February 09, 2015 In the immediate future, CEAT will lend support to the Regional Center for Training against Transnational Organized Crime, to provide training for other Central American Armed Forces. In recent years, CEAT has facilitated U.S. training with special units within the National Civil Police (PNC), specifically in tasks related to public security, explained Maj. Morley. CEAT cooperates with other security forces CEAT has also been recognized for its successful participation in multinational military competitions like Fuerzas Comando, a military and Special Operations skills exercise sponsored by U.S. Southern Command and Special Operations Command South. According to Maj. Morley, this select group of Salvadoran Military members is characterized by undertaking rigorous training that facilitates their development in adverse scenarios, whether by air, sea, or land. Additionally, since August 2012, members of the counterterrorist command have joined elite units of the PNC in patrolling the public transportation units of San Salvador’s Metropolitan Area, and members of the public feel safer with their presence. “We train bravely and honorably for each competition, and our service members support each other to do the best possible job,” said a member of CEAT who is not identified for security reasons. “This is a team that the people of El Salvador can be proud of.” CEAT has also joined the Cuscatlán Battalion in their efforts to rebuild damaged areas and promote peace in Iraq. The physically demanding competition showcases the skills of its contestants, encourages camaraderie among participants, and promotes military-to-military relationships, increased interoperability and improved regional security. They are also connected to the work the elite units perform in the field. Next December, they will celebrate 30 years in service, for which they have been recognized throughout Latin America as an outstanding, professional team capable of responding quickly to a variety of public safety threats, according to U.S. Army Major Kenneth Morley, a representative of the U.S. Security Cooperation Office in El Salvador. In recent years, CEAT has facilitated U.S. training with special units within the National Civil Police (PNC), specifically in tasks related to public security, explained Maj. Morley. According to Maj. Morley, this select group of Salvadoran Military members is characterized by undertaking rigorous training that facilitates their development in adverse scenarios, whether by air, sea, or land. “The Military has always inspired confidence in us. When we see them on buses, we know that we are being protected,” said Soraya de Martínez, a resident of Soyapango municipality, where the CEAT provides security. “They are very well trained, read more

Arrest in Napper Tandy’s Bar Shooting

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police Monday arrested a Fort Salonga man for allegedly shooting another man at Napper Tandy’s Irish Pub in Northport Sunday night.Steven Reilly Jr. was arrested at his home and charged with assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal use of a firearm.Police said Reilly and another man were involved in a fight “for an unknown reason” before the 39-year-old allegedly shot the victim in the leg around 10:30 p.m. Reilly then fled in a white Ford Taurus, police said.Northport Village police said the 21-year-old victim was transported to Huntington Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.Reilly will be arraigned Tuesday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img

Success through a woman’s lens

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Success doesn’t look the same to everyone. Consider the story arcs of fictional characters Don Draper and Peggy Olson of the television series “Mad Men”—the ’60s drama portraying the ad men (and women) of Madison Avenue. Early on, Olson’s talents are recognized by Draper and blossom under his mentorship. By season seven, the roles have reversed, and Olson becomes a declining Draper’s boss. Along the way, she sees the realities and fallacies of success and realizes it’s not always about power or money.Personal and professional success means something different to each of us. Like Peggy of “Mad Men,” most of us navigate many paths to achieve it, experiencing highs and lows along the way and pondering what it is we really want. Amy Herbig, CEO of The BA Group, Northfield, Minnesota, and speaker at CUES School of Strategic Marketing™ (which will be held online this year via a blended learning format), has grappled with this same thought: How can we define success when it differs not only by the individual but by gender?She explains that women carry a long history of struggles, unrealistic expectations and judgment cast by others while trying to find what it means to be “successful” within themselves and their careers. “Success includes attributes that define us overall—education, career, family and motherhood, appearance and physical activity, as well as behavior as an employee, wife, daughter, sister or friend. Unfortunately, the residue from years of fighting for professional equality can linger, with age-old topics of equal pay, sexual harassment in the workplace, and scrutiny for balancing motherhood and a career,” Herbig continues. “Our gender hasn’t always been gracious to one another either—women can be quick to judge other women—not to mention us being our own inner-critics.last_img

Cost, resistance aired in HHS webcast on antivirals

first_imgDec 17, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Cost issues and the risk of viral resistance drew considerable attention today in an online presentation by federal health officials on their revised guidance regarding use of antiviral drugs in an influenza pandemic.The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released two guidance documents this week, one on antiviral use in general and one on employer stockpiling of antivirals.The general guidance says national and state antiviral stockpiles will be reserved mainly for treating the sick in a pandemic. It says that healthcare and emergency workers likely to be exposed to the sick should receive preventive antiviral treatment, with the doses provided by their employers.The guidance on employer stockpiling supports the general guidance, recommending that businesses and organizations that employ workers likely to be exposed to infection provide prophylactic antiviral treatment for them. It also says that critical infrastructure employers should strongly consider providing antiviral prophylaxis for essential workers.In today’s HHS “PlanFirst” webcast, Dr. Benjamin Schwartz, MD, said the retail costs of the two recommended antivirals, oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza), range from about $50 to $80 per treatment course.It may be possible for some groups, particularly healthcare organizations, to buy the drugs at a much lower cost through their state health department, but this would be limited to groups working with health departments as part of state pandemic planning, said Schwartz, who is senior science advisor with HHS’s National Vaccine Program Office.The other option for organizations seeking to buy antivirals, Schwartz said, is to participate in manufacturer programs that permit groups to reserve a supply by paying a small annual fee per treatment course. The manufacturer keeps the doses up to date, and in the event of a pandemic, the buyer pays the wholesale price for delivery of the product. Both Roche, maker of Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, maker of Relenza, offer such programs.”It could almost be looked at as pandemic insurance,” Schwartz said.However, the cost of an antiviral program is more than just the per-regimen amount, HHS officials said. Workers who will receive the drugs will need medical screening, and there will be storage and dispensing costs as well.The HHS acknowledges the risk that a pandemic virus develops resistance to the antiviral drugs. Schwartz noted that one of the three subtypes of seasonal influenza, A/H1N1, recently has shown increased resistance to oseltamivir.”What is the implication of this?” Schwartz said. “I have to emphasize that this one virus is largely resistant, whereas other flu viruses that are circulating and the avian H5N1 virus remain susceptible to Tamiflu and Relenza. The types of changes, the mutations that have made the H1N1 virus resistant are unlikely to occur in a pandemic virus, so therefore we have not changed our recommendations for planning and stockpiling.”He also commented later, “It’s possible that resistance might occur to one drug but not the other, and because of that, some level of diversification between the two products is wise.”The national stockpile of antivirals is about 80% oseltamivir and 20% zanamivir, according to HHS. The reason it’s divided this way, said Schwartz, is that oseltamivir as an oral drug spreads throughout the body, whereas zanamivir is inhaled and therefore may work best in the respiratory tract.”So there may be a theoretical benefit to Tamiflu,” he said. “Tamiflu may also be a little bit easier to stockpile and there’s a little more flexibility with use because you can go down to a lower age.” (Oseltamivir is approved for treatment and prophylaxis in persons 1 year and older; zanamivir is approved for treatment of those aged 7 years and older and for prophylactic use in those aged 5 years and up.)In response to a question, Schwartz said the national stockpile includes some pediatric doses of antivirals. Relenza does not come in a pediatric dose, he said, adding, “It’s possible to open up the Tamiflu capsule and put the material from it in a syrup or liquid and dispense it in that way.””I would reassure people that there is drug available for treatment of their children if their children become ill,” he said.Another question from a listener was whether school teachers and staff are included in the HHS recommendations for prophylactic antiviral treatment.Lisa Koonin, MN, MPH, replied that schools would probably be closed early in a pandemic, a step that would help protect teachers and staff. Koonin is senior adviser in the Influenza Coordinating Unit at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In other comments, Schwartz said there is no evidence that the two antiviral drugs are harmful in pregnant women, “so for read more

WHO likely to counsel restraint on antivirals for H1N1

first_img Shindo said the WHO has little information so far about the results of antiviral treatment in novel H1N1 cases and wants countries to communicate their findings. In particular, the agency has very little information about the effectiveness of late treatment with oseltamivir or about results with zanamivir. For both drugs, the manufacturers say treatment should be started within 48 hours after illness onset. May 12, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) plans to release clinical guidance that will say most patients sick with the novel H1N1 influenza (swine flu) will not need antiviral treatment, but the drugs should be considered for high-risk groups, a WHO official said today. “European countries, which are mainly importing their cases, have been using antivirals very aggressively,” she said. “Countries like Mexico and the United States are trying to save their treatment for patients with underlying conditions and also the other groups at increased risk, such as pregnant women.” Besides discussing antivirals, the WHO clinical guidance will recommend simple supportive treatment such as antipyretics and hydration, Shindo said. CDC guidance on antiviralshttp://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/recommendations.htm Children and youth on long-time aspirin therapy At a CDC news briefing today, Dr. Anne Schuchat said, in response to a question about extensive antivral use in Europe, that the focus in the United States is on using antivirals for treatment of sick people, whereas some other countries are using antivirals to try to prevent the virus from spreading from infected travelers to others. Since geographic containment of the virus is no longer possible in the United States, the emphasis is on reducing its impact, she noted. “It largely depends on the availability of antivirals,” she said. Later she commented, “We don’t have a really strong position on the use of antivirals, because it’s part of their national pandemic preparedness plan.” The CDC and WHO say the new virus is sensitive to oseltamivir and zanamivir (the neuraminidase inhibitors) but resistant to amantadine and rimantadine (the adamantanes). Later she added, “We will recommend to consider the use of antivirals for high-risk groups or the group of people at increased risk, depending on availability.” Nursing home residents Yesterday the WHO said the new virus usually causes only a mild illness in otherwise healthy people. Shindo emphasized that the use of antiviral treatment in any given country will be strongly influenced by the availability of the drugs and the country’s pandemic preparedness plan.center_img See also: Also, in some human H5N1 cases in Vietnam, the rise of oseltamivir resistance was ascribed to “suboptimal treatment doses,” she said, adding, “So public health officials may decide to use antivirals aggressively because that’s what they’ve been preparing for and that’s part of their pandemic preparedness plan.” Shindo also commented that antivirals are being used much more extensively for H1N1 in Europe than in North America. Children under 5 Shindo was asked if the aggressive use of antivirals in Europe might contribute to resistance to the drugs. She replied that the rise of osletamivir resistance in seasonal H1N1 viruses over the past 2 years seemed unrelated to use of the drug, as it arose in areas where oseltamivir was not often prescribed for seasonal flu. As described by Shindo, the WHO guidance on antivirals will probably align with what the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is recommending. The CDC’s interim clinical guidance says that patients who have an uncomplicated febrile illness typically do not need antiviral treatment unless they are at risk for complications. High-risk groups are the same as those for seasonal flu: “Soon we will be publishing initial guidance for clinical management for this disease,” said Dr. Nikki Shindo, leader of the WHO clinical team for response to the H1N1 epidemic, speaking at a news briefing. “We are highlighting the fact that most of the patients will not require hospitalization or antiviral therapy.” Pregnant women People with chronic medical conditions or immunosuppression WHO’s novel H1N1 flu page Adults 65 and olderlast_img

Thierry Henry reacts after Arsenal draw to Bournemouth in Mikel Arteta’s first match as head coach

first_imgAdvertisement ‘There were positive but a point at struggling Bournemouth isn’t great. He has a lot of work to do.‘These players haven’t suddenly turned a corner. It will take months and months, if not new players to do it.’Arteta’s Arsenal, currently 11th in the Premier League, face London rivals Chelsea this weekend.MORE: Mesut Ozil shows support for Mikel Arteta after Arsenal’s draw with BournemouthMORE: Mikel Arteta praises Mesut Ozil after Arsenal’s draw against Bournemouth Thierry Henry has reacted after Arsenal drew to Bournemouth in Mikel Arteta’s first match (Picture: Amazon)Thierry Henry admits he saw little sign of progress after Arsenal drew to Bournemouth in Mikel Arteta’s first match as head coach.Arteta was confirmed as the new Arsenal boss last week and saw his side draw 1-1 with struggling Bournemouth on Boxing Day.Arsenal striker Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s 12th Premier League goal of the season cancelled out Dan Gosling’s first-half strike at Dean Court. Arteta’s side could only clinch a point at Bournemouth (Picture: Getty)Asked for his thoughts on the match, Arsenal legend Henry told Amazon: ‘In all fairness it’s very difficult to judge someone after one game and only a few days of training.ADVERTISEMENT‘What I’ve seen today is what I’ve seen for a long time with Arsenal. I don’t think they played well but Aubameyang scored. I’ve seen that so many times.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘We go back to the [Bournemouth] goal. I don’t want to name names but we’re talking about the same guys again and again.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘[Alexandre] Lacazette should have won it with a good chance but it’s difficult to judge that team right now. They are trying to learn under a new manager so we will see.‘But what I’ve seen today is what I’ve seen for a long time… not that great and Aubameyang scored.’Former Arsenal star Lee Dixon added: ‘The problem is we’ve got used to mediocrity. Arteta has come in to a new club so he’s going to praise his players.”The urgency is now”@Arsenal fans – happy with how Arteta set up your side today?#PLonPrime #BOUARS pic.twitter.com/Ko2b52X30g— Amazon Prime Video Sport (@primevideosport) December 26, 2019 Commentcenter_img Metro Sport ReporterThursday 26 Dec 2019 11:26 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link5kShares Advertisement Thierry Henry reacts after Arsenal draw to Bournemouth in Mikel Arteta’s first match as head coachlast_img

ADS Crude Carriers to Start Fitting Scrubbers on Its VLCCs

first_imgThe newly established tanker owner and operator ADS Crude Carriers is about to fit scrubbers on board its very large crude carriers.   The company was set up in April this year in Cyprus, with a fleet of three VLCCs, built in Japan as sister vessels. The VLCC owner and operator plans to expand its fleet with more acquisitions.“After a period of start-up activities and building up the initial fleet of VLCC’s, the company will focus on streamlining the operations to maximize shareholder returns. In addition, the project of installing scrubbers on board the vessels for the purpose of reducing emissions and operating costs will be started.”All three ships have been delivered to the company and have secured employment, the company said in its first business results.The vessel Front Page, to be renamed ADS Eagle, was delivered to the company on July 20 and went directly to a charter as FSO west of Nigeria. The duration of the charter is between 150 and 210 days.ADS Stratus was delivered on August 9, 2018 and is on its way to an approximately 40-day spot charter for transport of crude oil. Finally, ADS Serenade was delivered on September 13, 2018 and will be trading in the spot market.The vessels have been put under commercial management of Frontline Management and technical management of OSM Ship Management AS.On August 28, 2018 ADS Crude Carriers Plc was accepted for trading at the Oslo Stock Exchange’s Merkur Market.last_img

Would You Accept a First Date Invite Via Text?.

first_imgIs a phone call too much to ask for these days, or is being asked out via text the new (unromantic) norm? -Faye Brennan, BettyConfidential.comRomance really is dead. I came to this unfortunate realization a few days ago when I received a two-message text that went something like this: “Hi Faye, it’s Jake [not his real name], we met last weekend. Hope you had a great week! Mine was good but work was really busy… I’m going out of town this weekend, but I’d love to get together for a drink next week – would Tues or Weds work for you?”How can a girl resist that offer?Pretty easily, actually. Jake seemed like a nice guy when I met him, and I would’ve went out with him… if he hadn’t blown it with this first date invite text. For starters, why didn’t he just use his phone for what it was originally intended for, CALL ME and use his words to ask me out for the first time? He obviously had a lot to say – a two-message text just seems ridiculous, and it requires zero effort.Do you know what that means to me when your very first move has no effort involved? It means you’re probably going to also pick a place that’s more convenient for you for our date, you’ll expect to get some at the end despite the fact that you didn’t really do anything exceptional, and that pattern will continue for the rest of our relationship. Why would I want to go out with someone like that?I’m usually not so against texting, I think it’s a great and useful way to communicate, but it’s situations like this where I find it unacceptable. You text your friends to ask what they’re doing tonight. You text your mom to wish her a great day at work. You text your guy to make plans once you’ve been dating for awhile. But, you don’t text someone you’re trying to “woo.”Yes, like that girl from Glee, I want to be wooed. Call me old-fashioned, but I expect a phone call when you want to ask me out for the first time. I don’t think that is asking for too much, do you?My personal bottom line: call me, and you will get the date. Text me, and I feel like I’m nothing special and not worth taking up five minutes of your time. You may be a nice guy, but you will not get a response. LifestyleRelationships Would You Accept a First Date Invite Via Text?. by: – June 9, 2011 Tweet Share 104 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Sharing is caring! Sharelast_img